December TBR

In A Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth WareNora hasn’t seen Clare for ten years. Not since the day Nora walked out of her old life and never looked back. Until, out of the blue, an invitation to Clare’s hen party arrives. A weekend in a remote cottage – the perfect opportunity for Nora to reconnect with her best friend, to put the past behind her. But something goes wrong. Very wrong. And as secrets and lies unravel, out in the dark, dark wood the past will finally catch up with Nora.

Skitter by Ezekiel BooneTens of millions of people around the world are dead. Half of China is a nuclear wasteland. Mysterious flesh-eating spiders are marching through Los Angeles, Oslo, Delhi, Rio de Janeiro, and countless other cities. According to scientist Melanie Gruyer, however, the spider situation seems to be looking up. Yet in Japan, a giant, truck-sized, glowing egg sack is discovered, even as survivors in Los Angeles panic and break the quarantine zone. Out in the desert, survivalists Gordo and Shotgun are trying to invent a weapon to defeat the spiders. But even if they succeed it may be too late, because President Stephanie Pilgrim has been forced to enact the plan of last resort: The Spanish Protocol. Every country must fight for itself. And the spiders are on the move…

Fresh Complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides`What was it about complaining that felt so good? You and your fellow sufferer emerging from a thorough session as if from a spa bath, refreshed and tingling?’ The first-ever collection of short stories from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jeffrey Eugenides presents characters in the midst of personal and national emergencies. We meet Kendall, a failed poet who, envious of other people’s wealth during the real estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; and Mitchell, a lovelorn liberal arts graduate on a search for enlightenment; and Prakrti, a high school student whose wish to escape the strictures of her family leads to a drastic decision that upends the life of a middle-aged academic.

Who Rules The World? by Noam ChomskyFrom the dark history of the US and Cuba to China’s global rise, from torture memos to sanctions on Iran, Chomsky explores how America’s talk of freedom and human rights is often at odds with its actions. Delving deep into the conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Israel/Palestine, he provides nuanced, surprising insights into the workings of modern-day imperial power.The world’s political and financial elite have become ever more insulated from democratic constraints on their actions. Chomsky shines a powerful light on this inconvenient truth. With climate change and nuclear proliferation threatening the survival of our civilization, the message has never been more pertinent or more urgent: the need for an engaged and active public to steer the world away from disaster grows ever greater.

November Reading Wrap-Up

Total Books Read: 2
November TBR Books Read: 1
2017 TBR Challenge Books Read: 1
Total Pages Read: 530
Total Hours Listened: 14 hours 21 minutes

Faithless by Karin Slaughter – 3/5 – I picked this up at a book exchange last month and was excited to read another Karin Slaughter title because she is fast becoming one of my favourite authors. This was an okay book, nothing special in my opinion, and not the first thing I would recommend if you are going to read something by Karin Slaughter. My co-worker also accidentally spoiled a major plot point in the story arc of this series, so that put a bit of a dampener on things while I was reading.

Mr Mercedes by Stephen King – 4/5 – I am turning into a massive fan of Stephen King. This is the… sixth (?) book of his that I have read, and it is one of my favourites so far. But come on, Stephen King taking on the crime genre? How could I not love this book. I love how detailed Stephen King’s books are, and this did not disappoint. His characters are always so richly developed, and Mr Mercedes was a satisfyingly creepy villain and a perfect match to Bill Hodges our protagonist. This is part one in a trilogy and I can guarantee that I’ll be reading the next two books in this series at some point next year.

November TBR

In A Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware – Nora hasn’t seen Clare for ten years. Not since the day Nora walked out of her old life and never looked back. Until, out of the blue, an invitation to Clare’s hen party arrives. A weekend in a remote cottage – the perfect opportunity for Nora to reconnect with her best friend, to put the past behind her. But something goes wrong. Very wrong. And as secrets and lies unravel, out in the dark, dark wood the past will finally catch up with Nora.

Second Chance Summer by Morgan Matson – Taylor Edwards’ family aren’t close but when they receive some life-changing news they decide to get to know each other again, spending one last summer together at their old lake house. But Taylor is faced with the past she ran away from. Her former summer best friend is still living across the lake and still as mad with Taylor as she was five years ago, and her first boyfriend has moved in next door… but he’s much cuter at seventeen than he was at twelve. Can one summer be enough time to get a second chance – with family, friends, and love?

Fresh Complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides – `What was it about complaining that felt so good? You and your fellow sufferer emerging from a thorough session as if from a spa bath, refreshed and tingling?’ The first-ever collection of short stories from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jeffrey Eugenides presents characters in the midst of personal and national emergencies. We meet Kendall, a failed poet who, envious of other people’s wealth during the real estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; and Mitchell, a lovelorn liberal arts graduate on a search for enlightenment; and Prakrti, a high school student whose wish to escape the strictures of her family leads to a drastic decision that upends the life of a middle-aged academic.

Faithless by Karin Slaughter – A walk in the woods takes a sinister turn for police chief Jeffrey Tolliver and medical examiner Sara Linton when they stumble across the body of a young girl. Incarcerated in the ground, all the initial evidence indicates that she has, quite literally, been scared to death. But as Sara embarks on the autopsy, something even more horrifying comes to light. Something which shocks even Sara. Detective Lena Adams, talented but increasingly troubled, is called in from vacation to help with the investigation – and the trail soon leads to the neighbouring county, an isolated community, and a terrible secret…

October Reading Wrap-Up

Total Books Read: 4
October TBR Books Read: 3
Spookathon TBR Books Read: 2
2017 TBR Challenge Books Read: 1
Total Pages Read: 1,149
Total Hours Listened: 1 Hour 54 Minutes

The Silent Invasion by James Bradley – 3/5 – This was my library book for the month, and to be honest it put me into a bit of a reading slump. I think I need to accept the fact that I just don’t really like science fiction novels. This was the first book in a trilogy, but I don’t think I will continue with the series.

Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell – 4/5 – This book ranks in the top five of my favourite classics, and even though it was published in 1949 the story still holds up to this day. In fact it feels a little bit too real reading it in 2017.

Love Murder by Saul Black – 4/5 – I was fairly confident going into this book that I would enjoy it, because I loved The Killing Lessons which was the first book in the series. I’m happy to say that I wasn’t disappointed. This was the second book I read for Spookathon, and a real page turner that I managed to power through in two days. Just an FYI – you don’t need to read book one to understand or enjoy book two.

End Of The Innocence by Alessandra Torre – 3/5 – This had been sitting on my kindle for a while, and I knew that I was going to be trying to finish more books off this month than usual (thanks to the Spookathon), so I put this on my TBR knowing it would be a quick and easy read. I really love Alessandra Torre’s books, they are a liiiiittle bit trashy but I love them all the same.

September Reading Wrap-Up

Total Books Read: 6
July TBR Books Read: 3
2017 TBR Challenge Books Read: 1
Total Pages Read: 1,679

The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter – 4/5 – I became an instant fan of Karin Slaughter after reading Pretty Girls last year, so when I saw she had a new release coming out in 2017 I was really excited to pick it up. I managed to snag the first reserve at my local library, and it was number one on my list of books to read in September. I’m happy to say that even though my expectations were extremely high, I was not let down. I don’t like to go into too much detail when it comes to thrillers, but after reading this I’m confident in saying Karin Slaughter is one of my favourite authors.

The Leaving by Tara Altebrando – 2/5 – I bought this book last year with the intent of it being one of my summer reads for 2016. That never happened, so I picked it this month to try and get it off my TBR shelf. I didn’t really connect with any of the characters, which was an important factor that I think would have made this book more interesting for me. The book is written from the perspective of a handful of characters, and the writing style used for one in particular really irritated me. This was a bit of a nothing book for me, it wasn’t particularly memorable and I wouldn’t recommend it.

Nothing by Annie Barrows – 3/5 – This was my kindle/Netgalley read for the month, and I went into it expecting a bit of lighthearted contemporary fun. Which is exactly what I got, so I was happy about that. Thinking back on this book, nothing really happens, and there is no sort of lesson or ‘point’ to the story, but I liked that about it. It was nice to dip into the mind of a teenager for a short while.

Sweet Valley University #2 – Love, Lies, and Jessica Wakefield – 4/5
Sweet Valley High #71 – Starring Jessica! – 4/5
Sweet Valley High #82 – Kidnapped by the Cult! – 4/5